jeudi 23 mars 2017

Press Release: Algonquins of Barriere Lake Call to End Third Party Management: Paying Government-Imposed Accountants 40 Time Initial Deficit



(Ottawa, Algonquin Territory/March 23, 2017) Today, representatives of the Algonquins of Barriere denounced the federal government for imposing financial management on their band by accountants who earned millions of dollars over the last 10 years paid out of meager band funds.

NDP, M.P. Charlie Angus obtained documents that show that Barriere Lake pays much more than other bands under a federal policy of imposed “third party management” of the bands financial management for essential programs and services.

In 2006, the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs imposed third party management (TPM) to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake due to a $83,000 deficit, which has since been paid many times over in government-imposed accountant fees.

While the Third Party Manager Lemieux-Nolet is paid hundreds of thousands of dollars from band funds, a community member is living in the basement of a burned out home with his family because not a single new house has been built in the community in 11 years.

Because 10% of the bands funds are diverted into Third Party Management fees money runs dry for basic programs for the community annually. Youth attending colleges in Sudbury and Ottawa are texting band Councillor Norman Matchewan about going hungry day after day and being unable to pay their fees. Medical transportation services are being offered only once a day to and from the isolated community, forcing sick Elders to go to the hospital at 6 AM and return at 9 PM, despite having only a check-up mid-day.

On top of being forced into Third Party Management over 10 years ago with no exit plan, six years ago the federal Minister of Indian Affairs violated the internal autonomy and leadership customs of the band by imposing a “Section 74” order on the community.

Since then, Barriere Lake has been fighting to restore recognition for their customary government – an egalitarian, direct democracy of the people that existed for hundreds of years – that was arbitrarily and coercively replaced with a band council elective system. “Section 74” is a section of the Indian Act that has been rarely used since it was coercively exercised in 1924 over the Six Nations of the Grand River.

“We just want control back over our lives, the Third Party Manager continues to mismanage the programs meant for the benefit of our People by making financial transactions without our involvement or consent, or knowing anything about how our community is organized through our customs,” Chief Casey Ratt said.

Tony Wawatie, Barriere Lake’s Interim Director-General added “The Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs is doing a study on Third Party Management, which will likely be sent to the INAC-AFN Fiscal Relations consultation process and that will take another year. After 10 years our community services are in a mess and People want Third Party Management ended now as the new fiscal year is starting in a week.”

-30-

For More Information Contact:

Chief Casey Ratt                                                     Cell: (819) 441-8002
Tony Wawatie, Interim Director-General             Cell: (819) 355-3662
Michel Thusky (French) Spokesperson             Telephone: (819) 215-0591

Human Rights Delegates to Barriere Lake Support Community Demands for Immediate End to Third Party Management


SOLIDARITY STATEMENT March 23 2017


We are a group of civil society organizations, concerned citizens, and politicians who visited the Algonquins of Barriere Lake on their Rapid Lake Reserve on Wednesday. 

We sat aghast after presentations on the impact of “third party management” on the community. We learned that Indigenous Affairs hired external accounts to manage the band’s finances in 2006 while being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. Despite paying astronomical fees, Barriere Lake’s deficit of a measly $83,000 has not been paid off to this day. 

In the midst of plenty for Third Party Manager Lemieux-Nolet a community member is living in the basement of a burned out home with his family because not a single new house has been built in the community in 11 years. 

We heard stories of money running dry for basic programs for the community. Stories about youth attending colleges in Sudbury and Ottawa texting band councilor Norman Matchewan about going hungry day after day and being unable to pay their fees. Stories about medical transport being offered only once a day to and from the communities, forcing sick elders to go to the hospital at 6am and return at 9pm, despite having only a check-up mid-day. 

The stories of third party management were only matched in their kafka-esque nature by stories of how the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs imposed a “Section 74” order on the community in 2010, abolishing recognition of the community’s customary government. 

Since then, Barriere Lake has been fighting to restore recognition for their customary government – a land-based, direct democracy of the people – that was arbitrarily and coercively replaced with band council elections. “Section 74” is an archaic section of the Indian Act that is only rarely exercised.
“We just want control back over our lives,” Chief Casey Ratt said, addressing the group. 

We believe that the community is suffering from the collateral damage of a federal and provincial system that seeks to terminate the unceded jurisdiction of the Algonquions of Barriere Lake in order to remove impediments to access their rich lands for resource 
extraction and development. As the survival of Barriere Lake community members is put at stake daily by bureaucratic violence, Barriere Lake’s ability to sustain connection to their land is under attack by Toronto-based Copper One. We stand with Barriere Lake as they say no to mining on their territories.

Some delegates on our trip come from places around the world that are escaping civil war, but civil war is exactly what the treatment of Barriere Lake looked like to them. 


Zoe Todd, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Carleton University
Hayden King, Assistant Professor, Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University 


Representatives from the following organizations endorsed this letter: 


NYC Stands with Standing Rock
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network
Immigrant Workers Centre
Right Relations Network

Council of Canadians 
Ottawa Riverkeeper
Climate Justice Montreal 
Ecojustice
Justice for Adbirahman Abdi
Quebec Solidaire
No One Is Illegal 

Barriere Lake Solidarity 
Barriere Lake Defense

METTRE FIN À LA TUTELLE DES ALGONQUINS DU LAC BARRIERE

INVITATION MÉDIA

BDUGET FÉDÉRAL: METTRE FIN À LA TUTELLE DE LA NATION ALGONQUINE
DES FRAIS COMPTABLES 40 FOIS SUPÉRIEURS À LA DETTE INITIALE

Ottawa, 22 Mars 2017. La Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière tiendra une conférence de presse aujourd’hui, 23 mars, à 1h00pm, au Parlement d’Ottawa afin de dénoncer la mise en tutelle par le gouvernement fédéral dont elle fait l’objet depuis plus de 10 ans et qui lui a couté des millions en frais comptables, malgré les très faibles moyens financiers dont elle dispose. Le député et candidat à la course au leadership du NPD, Charlie Angus, se joindra à la conférence de presse, de même que des représentants de la société civile. Ces derniers ont participé, hier, à une journée d’information et de sensibilisation dans la communauté Algonquine afin de mieux comprendre les réalités auxquelles elle fait face.

Quand: 23 mars 2017, 1h00pm
Où: Salle Charles Lynch, Parlement d’Ottawa
Quoi: La Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière exigeant de mettre fin à leur mise en tutelle
Who: La Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière et le député Charlie Angus

Le député Charlie Angus a obtenu des documents qui démontrent que la Nation Algonquine paie beaucoup plus en frais comptables que d’autres communautés autochtones dans la même situation. En 2006, le Ministère des Affaires Autochtones a imposé une mise en tutelle de la communauté à cause d’un déficit de 83,000$. Ce déficit a aujourd’hui été payé plusieurs fois en frais comptables depuis plus de 10 ans, ce qui est un non-sens.

For more information:
- Chef Casey Ratt, Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, 819-441-8002
- Tony Wawatie, Directeur general par intérim, Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière,  819-355-3662
- Norman Matchewan, Band Councillor, Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière,  819-441-8006
- (Français) Michel Thusky, member de la communauté, 819-215-0591
- Charlie Angus, Député et candidat à la chefferie du NPD, 613-992-2919

vendredi 3 mars 2017

Brunch et blocages: brunch et projection de deux courts métrages sur les Algonquins du Lac Barrière

Depuis des mois, les Algonquins du Lac Barrière soutiennent un camp de protection des terres de leur territoire, situé à quelques heures au nord-ouest de Montréal. En septembre 2016, la communauté a appris que la compagnie minière junior Copper One planifiait entreprendre du forage exploratoire au coeur de leur territoire, sans son consentement ni avoir consultée. La communauté a répondu en installant un camp indéfini de défense du territoire pour bloquer l'accès à la route principale. Dans les dernières semaines, les droits miniers de la compagnie ont été suspendus suite aux pressions populaires, cependant, la compagnie a juré de poursuivre le gouvernement en cour afin de continuer son projet minier. Les Algonquins du Lac Barrière ont juré qu'aucun projet minier ne se ferait sur leurs territoires, spécialement le projet de Copper One parce qu'il aurait un impact direct sur la culture de la communauté et ses ressources en eau potable. Joignez-vous à nous pour la projection et le brunch afin d'entendre les derniers développements concernant la défense du territoire et en apprendre davantage sur la communauté et l'histoire de ses luttes. Nous projetterons le documentaire de 1989 Blockade: Algonquins Defend the Forest (27 minutes), suivi du documentaire de 2014 Honour Your Word (60 minutes). Quand: Dimanche, 12 mars 2017, 14 heures Où: L'Auditoire, 5214, boul. Saint-Laurent Admission: Gratuit (le brunch est payant) Une garderie sera disponible sur les lieux. L'endroit dispose d'un accès pour fauteuils roulants et de toilettes pour genre neutre. Les films sont en anglais avec sous-titres français et une traduction murmurée en espagnol sera disponible. L'activité s'inscrit dans le cadre de la Semaine contre l'apartheid d'Israël. Nous vous encourageons à en consulter la programmation. Au sujet des films: Honour Your Word est le portrait intime de la vie sous les barricades des Algonquins du Lac Barrière, une inspirante Première Nation dont la dignité et le courage contrastent grandement avec l'njustice politique qu'elle affronte. (2014, 60 minutes) Blockade suit les Algonquins du Lac Barrière alors qu'ils entreprennent la lutte contre le gouvernement et l'industrie forestière pour sauver leurs territoires de chasse et leur mode de vie. (1989, 27 minutes)

jeudi 16 février 2017

Alors qu’une minière poursuit Québec, plus de 2000 citoyens appuient la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière

Québec, jeudi 16 février 2017. Alors que la minière Copper One entame des procédures judiciaires contre Québec, plus de 2000 citoyens ont signé une pétition qui a été présentée ce matin à l’Assemblée nationale du Québec en appui à la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière. La pétition, déposée officiellement par la députée Manon Massé, appelle le gouvernement du Québec à suspendre les activités minières et à mettre en œuvre une entente de cogestion des ressources renouvelables sur l’ensemble du territoire ancestral de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière.
« Nous remercions la député Manon Massé et l’ensemble des citoyens qui nous appuient dans nos démarches. En 2017 et pour l’avenir, nous souhaitons que tous travaillent à la réconciliation avec les Nations Autochtones, et ce, dans le respect de leurs droits, intérêts et différentes visions de développement du territoire. C’est la seule façon d’assurer un avenir viable pour nos communautés et notre culture », affirme Casey Ratt, Chef de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière.
Rappelons que le territoire ancestral de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière se situe en partie dans la grande réserve Faunique La Vérendrye, à la tête des eaux de la rivière des Outaouais et à la jonction des régions de l’Outaouais, des Hautes-Larentides et de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue. Ce territoire a été défini par une entente trilatérale entre Québec, Ottawa et la Nation Algonquine en 1991.
Le 26 janvier 2017, le gouvernement du Québec a annoncé son intention de suspendre les titres miniers de la compagnie minière Copper One, ce qui a été confirmé le 8 février 2017. Bien que ce soit un pas dans la bonne direction, plus de 90% du territoire ancestral de la Nation demeure toutefois ouvert à l’exploitation minière—une situation inacceptable aux yeux de la Nation.
Le 1er février 2017, l’Assemblée des Premières Nations du Québec et du Labrador a adopté une résolution unanime qui condamne la Loi sur les mines du Québec comme étant « inconstitutionnelle » en regard des droits autochtones. Les Premières Nations exigent que Québec agisse et corrige la situation.
Le 6 février 2017, la compagnie minière Copper One débute des procédures judiciaires contre Québec. Le premier jour d’audiences devant la Cour supérieure du Québec est prévu le vendredi, 24 février, à Québec, dès 9h00am.
La Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière tente depuis des années de conclure avec Québec une entente de cogestion des ressources renouvelables du territoire. Une première entente a été signée en 1991 avec Québec et Ottawa, puis une deuxième en 1998 avec Québec. Mais ces ententes n’ont jamais été respectées et mises en œuvre par les gouvernements. En 2006, une entente consensuelle a été recommandée à Québec par les deux négociateurs spéciaux au dossier, M. Clifford Lincoln (Lac Barrière) et M. John Ciaccia (Québec). Malheureusement, Québec n’a jamais entériné ni mis en œuvre cette entente. Les négociations ont débuté de nouveau en 2015 avec le gouvernement de Philippe Couillard et sont toujours en cours. 
-30-
Pour information :
  • Michel Thusky (Français), Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, 819-215-0591
  • Chef Casey Ratt (English), Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, 819-441-8002
Intervenant externe : Ugo Lapointe (Français), Québec meilleure mine & MiningWatch, 514-708-0134

mercredi 1 février 2017

Des Nations Algonquines dénoncent la Loi sur les mines du Québec

Jeudi, 26 janvier 2017. 

Réunies ce matin en conférence de presse à Val d’Or, des Nations Algonquines unissent leur voix pour dénoncer la Loi sur les mines du Québec et les impacts qu’elle occasionne sur leurs droits ancestraux et territoriaux. Les Algonquins demandent au gouvernement du Québec de revoir les fondements mêmes de la loi, qui sont à leur avis non constitutionnels.

« Nous sommes confrontés, encore aujourd’hui, à des claims miniers et à des projets miniers pour lesquels nous n’avons jamais été informés, consultés, ou donné notre consentement, » dénonce le Chef Casey Ratt de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, qui a convoqué la conférence de presse.

« Nous sommes en faveur d’un développement viable de notre territoire, mais nous voulons pouvoir faire des choix qui respectent nos droits et qui répondent à nos besoins, nos attentes, nos valeurs. L’actuelle Loi sur les mines nous empêche de faire cela », ajoute le Chef Lance Haymond de la Nation Algonquine d’Eagle Village.

Selon le Chef Harry ST-Denis de la Nation Algonquine de Wolfe Lake: « Le gouvernement du Québec est responsable de s’assurer que ses lois et ses politiques minières respectent les droits constitutionnels des Nations Autochtones. La Loi sur les mines du Québec échoue toujours ce test en 2017. »

Les Nations Algonquines reprochent notamment à la Loi sur les mines de n’exiger aucune obligation d’information ou de consultation des Nations Autochtones avant que le gouvernement accorde des claims miniers sur leurs territoires traditionnels. La Loi n’exige pas, non plus, de permis et de consultation pour la vaste majorité des travaux d’exploration minière—notamment des travaux de forages, de décapages mécaniques et autres équipements lourds. La Loi sur les mines ne permet pas un aménagement intégré du territoire dans le respect des droits des Nations Autochtones, notamment par la possibilité de dire « non » à certains claims miniers situés dans des zones sensibles sur le plan social, culturel, ou environnemental.

Dans deux présentations prononcées ce matin à Val d’Or, les professeurs Jean-Paul Lacasse et Sophie Thériault de la Faculté de droit de l’Université d’Ottawa ont été clairs : l’actuelle Loi sur les mines ne passerait sans doute pas le test des tribunaux si elle devait être contestée par une Nation Autochtone au Québec. La solution passerait par une modification de la Loi et par la suspension et/ou le rachat des titres miniers dans les zones sensibles, le temps que la Loi soit modifiée et/ou que des ententes soient conclues avec les Nations Autochtones qui le demanderaient.

M. Clifford Lincoln, ancien ministre de l’Environnement du Québec et représentant spécial de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, abonde dans le même sens et considère qu’il serait beaucoup plus avantageux pour le gouvernement du Québec de privilégier la voie de la réconciliation et des ententes avec les Nations Autochtones, plutôt que celle de la négation (vidéo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79C7UEu600k&feature=youtu.be).

Bien que le gouvernement ait annoncé aujourd'hui son ‘intention’ du suspendre ‘temporairement’ les claims miniers de la compagnie Copper One sur le territoire de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, rien n’est certain à long terme. La Nation Algonquine, qui est située en partie dans la grande réserve faunique La Vérendrye, sollicite l’appui de la population pour protéger leur culture, la faune, la flore et les nombreux cours d’eau qui se trouvent sur leurs territoires.
La Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière a tenu une journée d’information et de sensibilisation hier, 25 janvier, à laquelle ont participé environ 25 personnes et organismes de la société civile québécoise, incluant notamment : Greenpeace-Québec, Amnistie internationale Canada, Ligue des droits et libertés du Québec, Coalition Québec meilleure mine, MiningWatch Canada, l’Action boréale de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue, le Regroupement vigilance sur les mines en Abitibi-Témiscamingue et le Conseil régional de l’environnement de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue.

Signez la pétition : www.assnat.qc.ca/fr/exprimez-votre-opinion/petition/Petition-6379/index....

Soutenez la Nation : http://solidaritelacbarriere.blogspot.ca/2008/03/dons.html
 
-30-
Pour information :

- Chef Casey Ratt (English), Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, 819-441-8002

- Chef Lance Haymond (English), Nation Algonquine Kebaowek (Eagle Village), 819-627-6884

- Chef Harry St-Denis (English), Nation Algonquine Wolfe Lake, cell. 819-627-3628

- Clifford Lincoln (Français/English), ancien ministre et représentant spécial de la Nation Algonquine Lac Barrière, 514-441-9446

- Tony Wawatie (Français/English), Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, 819-355-3662

- Michel Thusky (Français), Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière, 819-215-0591

Intervenants externes:

- Jean-Paul Lacasse, Faculté de droit, Université d’Ottawa, 819-210-1435

- Sophie Thériault, Faculté de droit, Université d’Ottawa, Sophie.Theriault@uottawa.ca

- Ugo Lapointe, MiningWatch Canada & Coalition Québec meilleure mine, 514-708-0134

**************************************************************************************
MÉDIAS:
Signez la pétition avant le 10 février:
www.assnat.qc.ca/fr/exprimez-votre-opinion/petition/Petition-6379/index....
Communiqué des Nations Algonquines à partager :
http://www.newswire.ca/fr/news-releases/des-nations-algonquines-denoncen...
Appui de l'Assemblée des Premières Nations du Québec et du Labrador:
http://www.newswire.ca/fr/news-releases/appui-aux-communautes-de-la-nati...
Vidéo d'appui de Clifford Lincoln, représentant spécial de la Nation Algonquine du Lac Barrière: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79C7UEu600k
Explications de M. Lacasse, Faculté de droit de l’Université d’Ottawa:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39DrXGCtS8A&feature=youtu.be
Explications (vidéo) de Sophie Thériault, Faculté de droit de l’Université d’Ottawa:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCWaJ6ciulE&feature=youtu.be
Appui de Québec solidaire:
http://www.fil-information.gouv.qc.ca/Pages/Article.aspx?idArticle=25012...
Réaction du gouvernement du Québec:
http://www.fil-information.gouv.qc.ca/Pages/Article.aspx?aiguillage=ajd&...
Article Radio-Canada:
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1013214/les-algonquins-de-lac-barrie...
Reportage Radio-Canada (radio):
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/l_heure_du_monde/2016-2017/archives...
Entrevue Radio-Canada (radio):
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/region_zero_8/2016-2017/archives.as...
Journal de Montréal :
http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2017/01/26/pret-a-tout-pour-bloquer-une...
Le Devoir :
http://m.ledevoir.com/article-490250
Vidéo reportage TVA (RNC):
http://www.tvaabitibi.ca/articles/20170126113834/communaute_algonquine_n...
Journal Écho-Abitibien:
http://www.lechoabitibien.ca/actualites/politique/2017/1/26/lac-barriere...
**************************************************************************************
CONTEXTE DE LA NATION ALGONQUINE DU LAC BARRIÈRE, SITUÉE EN PARTIE DANS LA GRANDE RÉSERVE FAUNIQUE LA VÉRENDRYE

La Nation algonquine du Lac Barrière a appris à l’automne 2016 que le gouvernement du Québec risque d’octroyer, dès les prochaines semaines, des permis qui permettraient à la compagnie minière Copper One d’ouvrir des chemins miniers et de débuter des forages miniers en plein cœur de son territoire traditionnel, et ce, malgré son désaccord manifesté à maintes reprises au gouvernement du Québec au cours des dernières années.

En fait, le gouvernement avait coopéré avec la Nation en 2011 en suspendant les titres miniers de la compagnie Copper One, mais le gouvernement a renversé cette décision plus tôt cette année, sans même informer, consulter, ou obtenir le consentement de la Nation—ce qui est contraire au respect des droits autochtones les plus élémentaires au Canada et à l’international. Cela est également contraire au respect du processus de négociation qui avait recommencer en 2015 entre la Nation du Lac Barrière et le gouvernement du Québec pour une cogestion intégrée des ressources du territoire.
La Nation algonquine du Lac Barrière est en faveur d’un développement responsable de son territoire, notamment via une foresterie intelligente, certains développements hydroélectriques, la chasse, la pêche et autres activités récréotouristiques, mais elle s’oppose à l’exploitation minière, qu’elle juge incompatible avec son mode de vie et ses visions de développement — notamment à cause de la nature non-renouvelable de la ressource et des quantités immenses de déchets miniers laissés derrière, à perpétuité, sur le territoire.

Le cœur du problème réside également dans le fait que la Loi sur les mines du Québec, malgré sa réforme en 2013, ne respecte toujours pas les droits des Nations autochtones en matière d’information, de consultation et du consentement avant l’octroi de claims miniers et l’exécution de travaux d’exploration minière sur les territoires revendiqués.

Face à cette situation, la Nation algonquine du Lac Barrière se dit maintenant prête à entreprendre toutes les actions nécessaires pour empêcher les forages miniers de débuter, incluant toute forme de résistance pacifique sur le terrain. Craignant les réactions de la compagnie Copper One, des corps policiers ou du gouvernement face à leurs actions, la Nation algonquine lance un appel à la solidarité et sollicite l’appui de toute personne ou organisme du Québec pour qui la défense des droits autochtones est prioritaire.

Signez la pétition : www.assnat.qc.ca/fr/exprimez-votre-opinion/petition/Petition-6379/index....
Soutenez la Nation : http://solidaritelacbarriere.blogspot.ca/2008/03/dons.html

Venez passer quelques jours sur le « Camp de défense de nos droits traditionnels » que nous avons érigé sur le territoire : contactez Norman Matchewan (819-441-8006) ou Michel Thusky (819-215-0591)
Pour plus d’informations :
• Le Devoir www.ledevoir.com/societe/actualites-en-societe/485180/lac-barriere-l-ass...
• Radio-Canada http://www.rcinet.ca/fr/2016/11/21/congres-quebec-mines-priorite-au-resp...
• L’Écho Abitibien www.lechoabitibien.ca/actualites/politique/2016/10/11/opposition-a-un-pr...
• Conférence de presse à l’Assemblée nationale de Michel Thusky (à 5:45min): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9vBHLW0g-I&feature=youtu.be
• Site Internet www.solidaritelacbarriere.blogspot.com
• Facebook https://www.facebook.com/BarriereLakeSolidarity
• Pétition www.assnat.qc.ca/fr/exprimez-votre-opinion/petition/Petition-6379/index....
• Dons en ligne ou par chèque.

vendredi 13 janvier 2017

Souper communautaire et présentation à Montréal

Jeudi le 19 janvier 2017
18h au Centre Lorne
2390 Ryde
(Métro Charlevoix)

Événement facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/650646381804261/

Venez manger avec nous et écouter des membres de la communauté parler de leur camp de défense du territoire et de leur lutte.

Dans les prochaines semaines, une compagnie minière prévoit débuter le forage exploratoire au coeur du territoire de la communauté, sans consultation ou consentement. Une mine Copper serait dévastatrice pour la communauté, et affecterait une partie importante de la réserve faunique La Vérendrye et des eaux affluentes de la rivière Ottawa. Des membres de la communauté ont établi pour une durée indéterminée un camp de défense du territoire, sur la route d'accès principale de la région.

Le souper est gratuit \ contribution volontaire. Les personnes participantes sont invitées à faire un don, si elles le peuvent. pour soutenir le camp de défense du territoire.

Accessibilité:
- L'espace est accessible aux fauteuils roulants
- Un service de garderie sera disponible sur place
- La traduction anglais-français sera disponible
- Nous encourageons d'éviter l'utilisation de produits avec des odeurs fortes (parfum, eau de cologne, etc.). Pour des informations complémentaires à ce sujet, voir http://www.cchst.ca/oshanswers/hsprograms/scent_free.html